KIPS Blog: Parenting Assessment in Practice & Research

Mindfulness Builds Positive Parenting for Moms in Opioid Use Treatment

Posted by Marilee Comfort on Wed, Nov 29, 2017 @ 12:59 PM

I’m delighted to share the results of a research study on a mindfulness-based parenting (MBP) intervention for mothers in treatment for opioid use disorders. With the abundance of news reports about the opioid epidemic, it’s heartening to share some good news regarding families affected by opioid misuse. This study is of special interest to me because it was carried out at the women’s substance abuse treatment center in Philadelphia where I worked for nine years.  As someone who formerly worked in this challenging field, I found this article inspiring. This relatively brief and inexpensive MBP group intervention produced an incredibly large change in the parenting behavior of mothers who struggled with multiple risk factors. 

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Tags: ACE, parenting behavior, opioid addiction, opioid use treatment, adverse experiences/toxic stress, mindfulness based parenting

Survey and Observational Assessments Not Correlated in CPS & Court-Involved Families: Implications for Services

Posted by Marilee Comfort on Thu, Jul 28, 2016 @ 06:50 PM

 

In a previous KIPS Blog, you learned about the MOVE program, an innovative, 13-week mandated parenting program for families affected by intimate partner violence (IPV) and involved in the court or child protective service systems.  Practitioners working with these families and the courts influence life-changing decisions on parent-child visitation and custody.  However, this critical work is hindered by two major difficulties.  First, there is a lack of research on how to effectively support families who have experienced IPV.  Second, few of these decisions are based on reliable evidence regarding the strengths and needs of these families. This is why I’ve been eagerly awaiting the results of the MOVE program evaluation study.

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Tags: court involved, domestic violence, intimate partner violence, parenting behavior, parenting assessments, MOVE program

How Can Parents’ Behavior Prevent Narcissism & Build Self-Esteem? New Research

Posted by Marilee Comfort on Mon, Mar 23, 2015 @ 01:48 PM

Narcissism - What comes to mind when you hear this word --  self-absorption, inflated self-image, lacking empathy, feeling better than others, taking others for granted?  Is this what we hope for our children?  Not really.  These are concerning words, and not what most parents wish for their children.  Of course we understand that very young children, birth to 5 years old, are naturally ego-centric as they learn where they fit in the world.  But when children reach school age and are developing a clearer sense of themselves and others, narcissism becomes a concern as an extreme personality trait which can harm children’s development and social relationships.  When most extreme, it is diagnosed as a personality disorder that requires therapeutic treatment. 

Research suggests that narcissism is increasing.  

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Tags: parenting behavior, Parenting Assessment, character development, narcissism, self-esteem, praise

New Research: Family Risk Factors Impair Parenting & Child Outcomes

Posted by Phil Gordon on Sat, Dec 14, 2013 @ 04:22 PM

A large longitudinal study conducted by a team at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina shows that for rural low-income families, cumulative risk factors can negatively affect parenting quality and child development, learning and behavior. This study is important because nearly 20% of children in United States families are located in rural communities and rural families are understudied. The Family Life Project followed 1292 children from low-income rural families over a 10-year period, and the results have been published as a monograph (The Family Life Project: An Epidemiological and Developmental Study of Young Children Living in Poor Rural Communities (2013). Lynne Vernon-Feagans, Martha Cox, and The Family Life Project Key Investigators, Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, Volume 78, Issue 5, Pages vii–vii, 1–150.)

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Tags: parenting behavior, Parenting Assessment, parenting quality, poverty

Pediatric Practice Parenting Groups Prevent Behavior Problems

Posted by Phil Gordon on Thu, Nov 14, 2013 @ 10:15 AM

The recognition of the importance of quality parenting continues to grow.  I was surprised to see a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics describing the use of parenting groups in pediatric settings with the goal of preventing behavior disorders.   The research performed by Ellin Perin and co-workers is entitled Improving Parenting Skills for Families of Young Children in Pediatric Settings.  

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Tags: parenting outcomes, parenting behavior, Parenting Assessment, parent-child interaction

Brief Parenting Intervention +Cell Phones Improves Parenting Outcomes

Posted by Phil Gordon on Thu, Nov 07, 2013 @ 01:20 PM

This week we share with you an exciting paper just published in Pediatrics, by Judith Carta and coworkers, entitled  Randomized Trial of a Cellular Phone-Enhanced Home Visitation Parenting Intervention, Pediatrics 2013;132:S167–S173.  We know well that the families most in need of parenting supports are the ones hardest to engage in services. Carta and her colleagues hypothesized that frequent contact with cell phones would improve outcomes.  We have been anxiously anticipating the publication of this study because it is the first randomized controlled trial to assess parenting using the Keys to Interactive Parenting Scale as an outcome measure.

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Tags: parenting feedback, parenting outcomes, parent improvement, parenting behavior, Parenting Assessment

Assessing Parenting to Develop Character: Optimism and Curiosity

Posted by Phil Gordon on Tue, Jun 25, 2013 @ 09:23 AM

In Paul Tough’s book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character, Tough discusses seven character traits that Angela Duckworth and colleagues have focused on as key to children’s success:

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Tags: parenting behavior, assessing parenting, character development

Assessing Parenting to Develop: Social Intelligence & Gratitude

Posted by Phil Gordon on Tue, Jun 18, 2013 @ 02:37 PM

In Paul Tough’s book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character, Tough discusses seven character traits that Angela Duckworth and colleagues have focused on as key to children’s success:

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Tags: parenting behavior, Parenting Assessment, assessing parenting, character development

Assessing What Matters to Parents as Teachers Families & Children

Posted by Phil Gordon on Mon, Jan 28, 2013 @ 03:34 PM

Because the best research on parenting guided the design of the Keys to Interactive Parenting Scale (KIPS)it aligns with the best parenting curricula.  After all, we drink from the same rich well of research.  In the KIPS Library, Crosswalks are currently available between the KIPS parenting assessment tool and three widely used parenting curricula:  Growing Great Kids, Partners in Parenting Education and the Born to Learn Curriculum.  Each crosswalk serves as a map between the KIPS parenting assessment results and specific parts of the curriculum that address the improvement of the particular parenting behavior of interest.  The Parents as Teachers Born to Learn Curriculum has recently been revised, and the new curriculum is called the Foundational Curriculum.  This article explores the relationship of KIPS to the Foundational Curriculum. 

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Tags: Parenting Assessment, parenting evidence, parenting outcomes, parenting behavior, Parents as Teachers

Assessing How Parents Promote Curiosity to Build a Fulfilling Life

Posted by Phil Gordon on Mon, Jan 21, 2013 @ 01:06 PM

Recently, I was talking with a couple of service providers taking the online Keys to Interactive Parenting Course (KIPS).  They both found learning the parenting assessment’s item on promoting exploration and curiosity particularly challenging.  This item was a late addition in the development of the parenting assessment, and the psychometrics showed that it complemented the other 11 KIPS items.  Long after KIPS was finalized, we came upon the work of Todd Kashdan at George Mason University, which further reinforced the importance of including this item in assessing parenting.  My thinking about exploration and curiosity has been deeply influenced by Kashdan’s book entitled: Curious: Discover the Missing Ingredient to a Fulfilling Life (2009, Harper Collins).  Kashdan argues that curiosity is among the most valuable of traits, because if one is curious, then one has the ability to learn and adapt.  He further states, “Children are born with boundless curiosity.” (p.7). It is our upbringing, schooling and society that constrain this birthright.  He also stresses that play provides a safe opportunity to explore.  This reinforces the use of play as the focus of the KIPS structured parent-child observation. 

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Tags: parenting outcomes, parenting behavior, Parenting Assessment, parenting scale, exploration, character development